Warfare

Military Book Reviews

White Sun War: The Campaign for Taiwan

Ryan ensures the readers do not lose the human factors. Friction, uncertainty, fear, and exhaustion beguile the characters on the ground throughout the campaign. The taxes these characteristics impose on each of the military actors are ever present in the text. Perhaps more critically, Ryan pulls on his voluminous knowledge of military history to offer compelling notional instances by which the miscalculation of senior leaders can lead rational actors to make decisions that, in hindsight, are anything but rational.

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Military Book Reviews

War Transformed: The Future of Twenty-First Century Great Power Competition and Conflict

Ryan packages his ideas about people, ideas, and technology as a force to better understand the enduring nature of, and changing character of, war. In doing so, he posits that globalization and the forces that drive it have led, and will continue to lead, to increased competition and conflict not only between militaries but the nation states that fund and support them. What will distinguish the leaders in these competitions will be how people who are professionally and self-educated take existing ideas and technologies, new technologies, and evolve them into new war-fighting strategies and concepts.

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Military Book Reviews

Mars Adapting: Military Change During War

Mars Adapting examines what makes some military organizations better at this contest than others. The book explores the internal institutional factors that promote and enable military adaptation. It employs four cases, drawing upon one from each of the U.S. armed services. Each case was an extensive campaign, with several cycles of action/counteraction. In each case, the military institution entered the war with an existing mental model of the war they expected to fight.

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